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MANILA — Rehabilitation czar Panfilo Lacson said Friday that Tacloban City got the biggest funding support from the National Government at P7 billion for estimated total damages brought by Typhoon Yolanda (Haiyan).

Tacloban is only one of the 171 cities and municipalities severely affected by Yolanda last year.

According to Presidential Assistant for Rehabilitation and Recovery (PARR) Secretary Lacson, the government has provided Tacloban City financial support amounting to P8.09 billion, half of the city’s requested and approved total funding requirement of P15.73 billion

“Based on these figures, Tacloban City has received the most funding support from the National Government for its rehabilitation needs,” Lacson said.

The said amount has been used to fund several projects in Tacloban that are either completed or already ongoing.

Among the ongoing projects are the repair of Tacloban Base Port, Daniel Z. Romualdez airport, City Hall Civic Center and public market, funded through the Department of Interior and Local Government.

The airport repair is targeted to be completed by the end of this year.

Also, the Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD) in coordination with PARR has started distributing Emergency Shelter Assistance (ESA) to affected households with damaged and destroyed houses in safe areas of Tacloban City.

The total amount of ESA distribution is P315.55 million.

Livelihood efforts have also been laid out for Tacloban City, and these include Cash for Building Livelihood Assets assistance to 9,725 families; Department of Labor and Employment’s employment program for 1,151 beneficiaries; and repair or replacement of damaged fishing boats for 547 fishermen.

To date, 1,124 housing units have been completed and 5,526 are undergoing construction and poised to be completed in 2015.

All targeted 14,433 permanent housing units for Tacloban City are already funded with the total amount of P4.01 billion.

“Most of the funds are coursed through implementing agencies such as the National Housing Authority, Department of Public Works and Highways, Department of Trade and Industry and DSWD. As PARR, my focus now is to exercise my oversight functions during the implementation stage and ensure that the rehabilitation projects are delivered efficiently and timely for the benefit of the people,” Lacson said.

He also ensured that all areas in the Yolanda corridor will get their needed assistance. (PNA/Sunnex)

Source: Sunstar

MANILA — Rehabilitation czar Panfilo Lacson said Friday that Tacloban City got the biggest funding support from the National Government at P7 billion for estimated total damages brought by Typhoon Yolanda (Haiyan).

Tacloban is only one of the 171 cities and municipalities severely affected by Yolanda last year.

According to Presidential Assistant for Rehabilitation and Recovery (PARR) Secretary Lacson, the government has provided Tacloban City financial support amounting to P8.09 billion, half of the city’s requested and approved total funding requirement of P15.73 billion

“Based on these figures, Tacloban City has received the most funding support from the National Government for its rehabilitation needs,” Lacson said.

The said amount has been used to fund several projects in Tacloban that are either completed or already ongoing.

Among the ongoing projects are the repair of Tacloban Base Port, Daniel Z. Romualdez airport, City Hall Civic Center and public market, funded through the Department of Interior and Local Government.

The airport repair is targeted to be completed by the end of this year.

Also, the Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD) in coordination with PARR has started distributing Emergency Shelter Assistance (ESA) to affected households with damaged and destroyed houses in safe areas of Tacloban City.

The total amount of ESA distribution is P315.55 million.

Livelihood efforts have also been laid out for Tacloban City, and these include Cash for Building Livelihood Assets assistance to 9,725 families; Department of Labor and Employment’s employment program for 1,151 beneficiaries; and repair or replacement of damaged fishing boats for 547 fishermen.

To date, 1,124 housing units have been completed and 5,526 are undergoing construction and poised to be completed in 2015.

All targeted 14,433 permanent housing units for Tacloban City are already funded with the total amount of P4.01 billion.

“Most of the funds are coursed through implementing agencies such as the National Housing Authority, Department of Public Works and Highways, Department of Trade and Industry and DSWD. As PARR, my focus now is to exercise my oversight functions during the implementation stage and ensure that the rehabilitation projects are delivered efficiently and timely for the benefit of the people,” Lacson said.

He also ensured that all areas in the Yolanda corridor will get their needed assistance. (PNA/Sunnex)

Source: Sunstar

MANILA — Rehabilitation czar Panfilo Lacson said Friday that Tacloban City got the biggest funding support from the National Government at P7 billion for estimated total damages brought by Typhoon Yolanda (Haiyan).

Tacloban is only one of the 171 cities and municipalities severely affected by Yolanda last year.

According to Presidential Assistant for Rehabilitation and Recovery (PARR) Secretary Lacson, the government has provided Tacloban City financial support amounting to P8.09 billion, half of the city’s requested and approved total funding requirement of P15.73 billion

“Based on these figures, Tacloban City has received the most funding support from the National Government for its rehabilitation needs,” Lacson said.

The said amount has been used to fund several projects in Tacloban that are either completed or already ongoing.

Among the ongoing projects are the repair of Tacloban Base Port, Daniel Z. Romualdez airport, City Hall Civic Center and public market, funded through the Department of Interior and Local Government.

The airport repair is targeted to be completed by the end of this year.

Also, the Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD) in coordination with PARR has started distributing Emergency Shelter Assistance (ESA) to affected households with damaged and destroyed houses in safe areas of Tacloban City.

The total amount of ESA distribution is P315.55 million.

Livelihood efforts have also been laid out for Tacloban City, and these include Cash for Building Livelihood Assets assistance to 9,725 families; Department of Labor and Employment’s employment program for 1,151 beneficiaries; and repair or replacement of damaged fishing boats for 547 fishermen.

To date, 1,124 housing units have been completed and 5,526 are undergoing construction and poised to be completed in 2015.

All targeted 14,433 permanent housing units for Tacloban City are already funded with the total amount of P4.01 billion.

“Most of the funds are coursed through implementing agencies such as the National Housing Authority, Department of Public Works and Highways, Department of Trade and Industry and DSWD. As PARR, my focus now is to exercise my oversight functions during the implementation stage and ensure that the rehabilitation projects are delivered efficiently and timely for the benefit of the people,” Lacson said.

He also ensured that all areas in the Yolanda corridor will get their needed assistance. (PNA/Sunnex)

Source: Sunstar

THE Diocese of Bacolod will launch the Year of the Poor tomorrow, November 30. Yet, the Catholic Church has been reaching out to the poor for centuries already.

A very concrete example is the Diocese of Bacolod itself through its Social Action Center located at the Palacio Episcopal. Its projects include Sustainable Agriculture and Rural Empowerment, Legal and Para-Legal Services, Justice and Peace Advocacy, Medical and Dental Missions, and Feeding Programs. As you can see, the church has been very busy.

Behind the diocese is a small army of dedicated workers that keep the wheels turning for the Catholic faithful. They’re not making loads of money here but their spiritual blessings must be fabulous.

One of the services offered by the church is Health and Wellness. In fact, there is a Botika sa Parokya situated at the St. John Marie Vianney, the newer building behind the San Sebastian Cathedral.

It is small. “Tiny” is the more appropriate term but it is a hub of wellness activities on certain days. My favorite day is Thursday because that’s the day when I show up for my acupuncture treatment.

Acupuncture is an ancient Chinese treatment meant to balance the yin and yang of our body by unblocking meridian points with needles inserted into the skin.

Suzette, my busy and patient therapist, sees a lot of patients on that day but never mind the crush – the location is convenient for me, and I help support the wellness project with my cash donation.

Suzette has been an acupuncturist since 1999 and this fact qualifies her to apply for licensing. It’s quite entertaining to watch her deftly tap needles into my skin. She uses high quality stainless needles that I bought from her and these were labeled to avoid a mix-up in the next visit.

For the uninitiated, Suzette uses a small narrow tube that acts as a guide for the needle during insertion. The needle when inserted into the skin hurts a bit and renders the local area numb. For thirty minutes or so, I have to be still not because I’m a naturally good girl but because I can’t move any limbs where a needle had been attached. This is not for those who’d faint at the sight of needles.

Suzette suggests an initial treatment of 12 sessions to maximize the benefits of acupuncture. Toxins in the body may be manifested by itching or minimal bleeding where the needles were removed.

On my fourth visit, she remarked that the skin surrounding the inserted needles were less taut now. She said that this is a good sign.

When I’ve completed the 12 sessions, I can move on to acupressure or reflexology. What is viable about the diocese’s programs is that the regular man need not pay a fixed rate for the services. While the indigents need not spend a lot of money to take the road to better health, there is no ceiling for those who can afford to give more.

The Social Action Center sells herbal health supplements made by communities for the purpose of establishing a source of steady income for them. This is in line with the Sustainable Agriculture and Rural Empowerment program of the diocese. I can buy ginger tea and turmeric capsules and skin ointments. These are all manufactured under strict supervision so these are guaranteed hygienically prepared.

I thank God that the church continues to do good works for the poor. Just as we enter the Year of the Poor it’s comforting to know that the church has been there a long, long time ago.

Source: Sunstar

THE Diocese of Bacolod will launch the Year of the Poor tomorrow, November 30. Yet, the Catholic Church has been reaching out to the poor for centuries already.

A very concrete example is the Diocese of Bacolod itself through its Social Action Center located at the Palacio Episcopal. Its projects include Sustainable Agriculture and Rural Empowerment, Legal and Para-Legal Services, Justice and Peace Advocacy, Medical and Dental Missions, and Feeding Programs. As you can see, the church has been very busy.

Behind the diocese is a small army of dedicated workers that keep the wheels turning for the Catholic faithful. They’re not making loads of money here but their spiritual blessings must be fabulous.

One of the services offered by the church is Health and Wellness. In fact, there is a Botika sa Parokya situated at the St. John Marie Vianney, the newer building behind the San Sebastian Cathedral.

It is small. “Tiny” is the more appropriate term but it is a hub of wellness activities on certain days. My favorite day is Thursday because that’s the day when I show up for my acupuncture treatment.

Acupuncture is an ancient Chinese treatment meant to balance the yin and yang of our body by unblocking meridian points with needles inserted into the skin.

Suzette, my busy and patient therapist, sees a lot of patients on that day but never mind the crush – the location is convenient for me, and I help support the wellness project with my cash donation.

Suzette has been an acupuncturist since 1999 and this fact qualifies her to apply for licensing. It’s quite entertaining to watch her deftly tap needles into my skin. She uses high quality stainless needles that I bought from her and these were labeled to avoid a mix-up in the next visit.

For the uninitiated, Suzette uses a small narrow tube that acts as a guide for the needle during insertion. The needle when inserted into the skin hurts a bit and renders the local area numb. For thirty minutes or so, I have to be still not because I’m a naturally good girl but because I can’t move any limbs where a needle had been attached. This is not for those who’d faint at the sight of needles.

Suzette suggests an initial treatment of 12 sessions to maximize the benefits of acupuncture. Toxins in the body may be manifested by itching or minimal bleeding where the needles were removed.

On my fourth visit, she remarked that the skin surrounding the inserted needles were less taut now. She said that this is a good sign.

When I’ve completed the 12 sessions, I can move on to acupressure or reflexology. What is viable about the diocese’s programs is that the regular man need not pay a fixed rate for the services. While the indigents need not spend a lot of money to take the road to better health, there is no ceiling for those who can afford to give more.

The Social Action Center sells herbal health supplements made by communities for the purpose of establishing a source of steady income for them. This is in line with the Sustainable Agriculture and Rural Empowerment program of the diocese. I can buy ginger tea and turmeric capsules and skin ointments. These are all manufactured under strict supervision so these are guaranteed hygienically prepared.

I thank God that the church continues to do good works for the poor. Just as we enter the Year of the Poor it’s comforting to know that the church has been there a long, long time ago.

Source: Sunstar

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